Tag Archives: PowerShell

PowerShell I Heart You

PowerShell = Giggity Giggity Goo

Ok so in the last 48 hours I think I’ve fallen madly in love with PowerShell. My time is limited so I’ll make this short. Last night I wrote a script to copy files from one file share to another and log the process. Luckily PowerShell community guru Laerte Junior (Blog | Twitter) and Ron Dameron (Blog | Twitter) were online and willing to help me out (as always). I aksed him some general questions but was determined to write script on my own and just have him review it and point me in right direction. So after much Boogling I got some code example and spat this PowerShell turd out: 

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]
try {
$a = (Get-Date -uformat "%Y%m%d").ToString()
 Get-ChildItem \servernameextracts_foldertestdata*.001 | ForEach-Object -Process{Move-Item -PassThru -Force $_.FullName -Destination \targetservernametest | Format-Table -AutoSize >> ("\servernameextracts_foldertestlogstest_extracts_copy" + $a + ".log")  }
}
 catch {
  "Error occurred on $_" >> \servernameextracts_foldertestlogstest_copyerrors.txt
}
 
try {
 Get-ChildItem \servernameextracts_foldertestdata*.IDX | ForEach-Object -Process{Move-Item -PassThru -Force $_.FullName -Destination \targetservernametest | Format-Table -AutoSize >> ("\servernameextracts_foldertestlogstest_extracts_copy" + $a + ".log")  }
}
 catch {
  "Error occurred on $_" >> \servernameextracts_foldertestlogstest_copyerrors.txt
}

[/sourcecode]

Basically it moves the files from one server to another and writes basic information of each file moved to a log file. The log file it writes to is dynamically named based on the date the script is ran. If the script bombs then it writes the errors to another log file the administrator can refer to for troubleshooting. 

Next up this morning I saw an article on SQLServerCentral.com ‘s newsletter on how to Make a 100+ Server Inventory in 30 minutes. 30 minutes? Hell, with PowerShell I think I could knock that out even quicker! And so I have, try 5. First create a text file with a list of all your server names. I’m sure you could get that using PowerShell too but Boogle it. Next try this code out: 

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]

Get-Content ‘c:serverlist.txt’ | ForEach-Object {systeminfo.exe /s $_ } | Out-File c:testserver_reports.txt

[/sourcecode]

ONE line of code and you have a full report of everything on your server. Giggity giggity goo! ALRIGHT!

Share

The PowerShell and XML Corollary

Girl Property Surrounded by Geek Objects

I’ve just started watching The Big Bang Theory so I figured I’d borrow a naming convention from their episodes with this blog post. This is a quick post as the problem itself is small and doesn’t have an application (yet).

A co-worker of mine was asked by a higher-up about possibly creating an in-house iPhone application that displays information from an existing SQL Server database. He is currently dabbling in iPhone development and he found that querying SQL Server directly was going to be a bit of a pain so he asked me if we could access the data via other (read also: easier) means such as reading from a data dump file that is in XML format. This limitation comes from the fact that there are no native API’s for Microsoft SQL in Cocoa. As a production DBA seeing anything involving XML gives me the heebie jeebies and I rely on the kindness of strangers, Scarlett O’Hara-style, to help me bridge my ignorance gap. So first thing I needed to find out was what was the easiest way to translate SQL Server data into XML. Now, I’m not completely dense and I know that from SQL Server 2005 and higher there were “a lot of things” put into the product that helped in the XML space but this particular server I am connecting to is SQL 2000 (ewww I know) and I wasn’t sure if it even handled XML the way I needed. I turned on the SQL Bat-signal and asked my Twitter folks to enlighten me on this enigma.

Continue reading

Share